Book

DINOSAURS OF THE GREAT RED ISLAND

Dec 12, 2017

The Great Red Island, commonly known as Madagascar, has been isolated for more than 88 million years, even though it’s separated from the southeast coast of Africa by less than 300 miles.


David Krause, senior curator of vertebrate paleontology, and Joe Sertich, curator of dinosaurs, have studied Madagascar’s unique fossil record for years. Discoveries in the northwestern Mahajanga Basin have revealed an incredibly diverse and well-preserved assemblage of dinosaurs and other animals that thrived on Madagascar approximately 67 million years ago.


Almost all of these species are new to science, and many represent extremely bizarre forms, such as the large predator Majungasaurus, the very bird-like dinosaur Rahonavis, the heaviest-known frog Beelzebufo, and the largest Mesozoic mammal of the southern hemisphere Vintana. These dinosaur hunters will share firsthand the amazing opportunity to work at this singular location on our planet and how ongoing expeditions continue to reveal significant scientific findings.