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Wild Things in Ancient Places: The Archaeology of the National Wildlife Refuges

Oct 21, 2019

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Somewhere beneath the tracks of the bison, the nests of the piping plover, and the burrows of the black-footed ferret are the tools and fires of earlier peoples. These animals and their habitats are protected on our National Wildlife Refuges – a system of public lands that also offers a rare opportunity to preserve archaeological sites and historic places (and the occasional dinosaur). The eight states that comprise the Mountain – Prairie Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge system extend from the Canadian border to the desert southwest. The cultural resources of the region span 12,000 years from Paleoindian camp sites to Depression-era fire towers. The paleontological remains, archaeological sites, and historic structures found on the Refuges are diverse and wonderful and provide some unique challenges. Presented by Meg Van Ness, Regional Historic Preservation Officer for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Location and Pricing: Golden History Museum, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., free for members; $10 plus online registration fee for non-members. Membership pays for itself with just a few programs for your family. https://www.goldenhistory.org/get-involved/membership/ Facility Rental - learn how a Golden Museum Rental offers unique experiences that range from rustic to ritzy. https://www.goldenhistory.org/visit/golden-museum-rental/

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